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46 CFR: The Complete Shipping Regulations for U.S. Waters


What is 46 CFR and why is it important for shipping?




If you are involved in any aspect of shipping within the United States or with US vessels abroad, you need to be familiar with Title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). This is the portion of the CFR that governs shipping for the United States Coast Guard, the United States Maritime Administration, and the United States Maritime Commission.


Title 46 is divided into four chapters and several subchapters, parts, sections, and appendices that cover a wide range of topics related to shipping, such as vessel inspection, marine engineering, load lines, marine casualties, merchant marine officers, dangerous cargoes, nautical schools, etc.




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Why is Title 46 important? Because it provides the minimum standards, procedures, and rules that ensure the safety, security, and efficiency of shipping in the US and abroad. By complying with Title 46, you can avoid accidents, injuries, fines, penalties, delays, or legal troubles that may arise from violating the regulations.


How to access 46 CFR online and offline?




There are several ways to access Title 46 depending on your preference and convenience. Here are some of them:


Online




The easiest way to access Title 46 online is through the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (eCFR) website. This is a continuously updated online version of the CFR that is not an official legal edition but is an accurate representation of the current regulations.


To navigate the eCFR website, you can use the table of contents on the left side of the page to browse by title, chapter, subchapter, part, or section. You can also use the search box on the top right corner of the page to enter keywords or phrases related to your query.


For example, if you want to find out about the requirements for small passenger vessels under 100 gross tons, you can enter "small passenger vessels" in the search box and click on "Search". You will get a list of results that match your query. You can then click on "Title 46 Chapter I Subchapter T" to see the relevant part (175-187) and sections.


Offline




If you prefer to have a printed or PDF version of Title 46, you can obtain it from various sources. One source is the Government Publishing Office (GPO), which publishes an annual edition of the CFR as well as monthly updates. You can order printed copies or download PDF files from their website or bookstore.


Another source is Cornell Law School's Legal Information Institute (LII), which provides free access to PDF files of Title 46. You can download individual parts or sections or the entire title as a single file.


How to use 46 CFR for different purposes?




Depending on your role and interest in shipping, you may use Title 46 for different purposes, such as compliance, reference, or education. Here are some tips on how to use Title 46 effectively for each purpose:


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46 cfr part 42 load lines for domestic and foreign voyages download


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46 cfr part 150 certain bulk dangerous cargoes download


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46 cfr subchapter j miscellaneous maritime regulations download


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46 cfr part 350 special rules for the carriage of agricultural commodities by water in the foreign commerce of the united states under the ... download


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46 cfr subchapter b regulations affecting ocean shipping in foreign commerce fmc download


46 cfr subchapter d regulations affecting maritime carriers and related activities in foreign commerce fmc download


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Compliance




If you are a ship owner, operator, builder, designer, engineer, crew member, or any other person or entity involved in the construction, operation, or maintenance of a vessel, you need to comply with the applicable regulations in Title 46. Failure to do so may result in fines, penalties, suspension, revocation, or seizure of your vessel or license.


To check the applicability and requirements of Title 46 for your vessel, you need to identify the following factors:


  • The type and size of your vessel (e.g., passenger vessel, cargo vessel, fishing vessel, recreational vessel, etc.)



  • The area and mode of operation of your vessel (e.g., inland waters, coastal waters, ocean waters, domestic trade, foreign trade, etc.)



  • The personnel and qualifications required for your vessel (e.g., officers, engineers, seamen, pilots, etc.)



Once you have identified these factors, you can use the table of contents or the search function of the eCFR website to find the relevant parts and sections of Title 46 that apply to your vessel. For example, if you have a small passenger vessel under 100 gross tons that operates on inland waters in domestic trade, you need to comply with the regulations in Subchapter T (Parts 175-187) of Chapter I.


Reference




If you are a researcher, educator, student, lawyer, journalist, or any other person or entity interested in learning more about shipping regulations in the US or abroad, you may use Title 46 as a source of information and reference. Title 46 contains a wealth of data and details about various aspects of shipping that can help you with your projects, assignments, reports, articles, or cases.


To find and cite information from Title 46 for your purpose, you need to follow these steps:


  • Identify the topic or question that you want to explore or answer (e.g., what are the safety standards for life-saving appliances on passenger vessels?)



  • Use the table of contents or the search function of the eCFR website to locate the relevant parts and sections of Title 46 that address your topic or question (e.g., Part 199 Subpart B)



  • Read and understand the content and context of the selected parts and sections (e.g., what are the definitions, requirements, exceptions, and interpretations of the regulations?)



  • Cite and reference the information from Title 46 using an appropriate citation style and format (e.g., APA, MLA, Chicago, etc.)



For example, if you want to cite Part 199 Subpart B using APA style, you can write something like this:


According to Title 46 Part 199 Subpart B of the Code of Federal Regulations (2023), passenger vessels must carry life-saving appliances such as lifeboats, liferafts, life jackets, immersion suits, and distress signals that meet the standards and specifications prescribed by the Coast Guard (199.60-199.261).


In your reference list, you can write something like this:


Code of Federal Regulations. (2023). Title 46: Shipping. Part 199: Lifesaving systems for certain inspected vessels. Subpart B: Requirements for all vessels. Retrieved from https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=0a8f7c9c6b0f9a2d1f5c8a9a1b9b7f1c&mc=true&node=sp46.7.199.b&rgn=div6 How to stay updated on changes and amendments to 46 CFR?




As you may have noticed, Title 46 is not a static document. It is constantly being revised and updated to reflect the changes and developments in the shipping industry and the regulatory environment. Therefore, it is important to stay informed and aware of the latest versions and amendments of Title 46 that may affect your vessel or your purpose.


Here are some ways to stay updated on changes and amendments to Title 46:


Updates




The eCFR website is the most reliable and convenient source for accessing the latest versions of Title 46. The website is updated daily with the changes and corrections published in the Federal Register, which is the official journal of the federal government that contains notices, proposed rules, final rules, and other documents related to federal agencies and organizations. You can check the date of the last update on the top of each page of the eCFR website.


If you want to access historical versions of Title 46, you can use the eCFR Archives, which contain annual editions of Title 46 from 1996 to present. You can also use the Federal Register Archives, which contain daily issues of the Federal Register from 1994 to present.


Amendments




If you want to participate in the process of proposing and adopting amendments to Title 46, you can use the Federal Register website or the Regulations.gov website to find and comment on proposed rules, notices of proposed rulemaking, requests for comments, petitions for rulemaking, and other documents that solicit public input on Title 46. You can also subscribe to email alerts or RSS feeds to receive notifications of new documents related to Title 46.


The process and criteria for amending Title 46 vary depending on the type and scope of the amendment, but generally involve the following steps:


  • An agency or organization initiates a rulemaking process by publishing a document in the Federal Register that explains the need and rationale for the amendment, provides a summary and analysis of the proposed changes, invites public comments and suggestions, and sets a deadline for submitting them.



  • The public can submit comments and suggestions online or by mail, fax, or email. The comments and suggestions are posted on the Regulations.gov website for public viewing.



  • The agency or organization reviews and evaluates the comments and suggestions received and decides whether to proceed with the amendment, modify it, or withdraw it. The agency or organization publishes a document in the Federal Register that announces its decision and provides a response to the comments and suggestions.



  • If the agency or organization decides to proceed with the amendment, it publishes a final rule in the Federal Register that specifies the effective date and codifies the amendment in Title 46. The final rule is also incorporated into the eCFR website.



Conclusion




In conclusion, Title 46 is a comprehensive and complex set of regulations that governs shipping in the US and abroad. It is essential for anyone involved or interested in shipping to understand and use Title 46 effectively for their purpose. By accessing Title 46 online or offline, using it for compliance or reference, and staying updated on changes and amendments, you can ensure that you are following the best practices and standards for shipping.


We hope that this article has provided you with useful information and guidance on how to download and use Title 46. If you have any questions or feedback, please feel free to contact us or leave a comment below. Thank you for reading!


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions and answers about Title 46:


  • What is the difference between CFR and eCFR?



The CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) is the official codification of general and permanent rules published by federal agencies and organizations. The eCFR (Electronic Code of Federal Regulations) is an online version of the CFR that is updated daily with changes published in the Federal Register. The eCFR is not an official legal edition but is an accurate representation of the current regulations.


  • How often is Title 46 updated?



Title 46 is updated daily with changes published in the Federal Register. The eCFR website shows the date of the last update on each page. The GPO publishes an annual edition of Title 46 as well as monthly updates in printed and PDF formats.


  • How can I find out if my vessel is subject to Title 46?



To find out if your vessel is subject to Title 46, you need to identify the type, size, area, and mode of operation of your vessel. One of the factors that determines the applicability of Title 46 is the type and size of your vessel. There are many types of vessels that are used for different purposes and have different characteristics. Some of the common types of vessels are:


  • Container ships: These are vessels that carry cargo in standardized containers that can be easily loaded and unloaded. Container ships are classified by their size and capacity, such as Panamax, Suezmax, Post-Panamax, etc.



  • Bulk carriers: These are vessels that carry dry bulk cargo, such as grains, coal, ore, cement, etc. Bulk carriers are also classified by their size and capacity, such as Handysize, Handymax, Panamax, Capesize, etc.



  • Tanker ships: These are vessels that carry liquid cargo, such as oil, gas, chemicals, etc. Tanker ships are also classified by their size and capacity, such as Aframax, Suezmax, VLCC, ULCC, etc.



  • Passenger ships: These are vessels that carry passengers for transportation or tourism purposes. Passenger ships include ferries, cruise ships, yachts, etc.



  • Naval ships: These are vessels that belong to the navy or other armed forces and are used for military or security purposes. Naval ships include aircraft carriers, submarines, destroyers, frigates, etc.



  • Offshore ships: These are vessels that operate in offshore areas and are used for exploration, production, or support of oil and gas activities. Offshore ships include drillships, FPSOs, AHTSs, PSVs, etc.



  • Special purpose ships: These are vessels that have a specific function or design that is not common among other vessels. Special purpose ships include icebreakers, research vessels, cable layers, dredgers, etc.



The size of your vessel is measured by various parameters, such as length overall (LOA), beam (width), draft (depth), gross tonnage (GT), deadweight tonnage (DWT), etc. These parameters affect the maneuverability, stability, and performance of your vessel as well as the ports and waterways that you can access.


To find out the type and size of your vessel, you can check the ship's documents or certificates or consult with the ship's builder or designer. You can also use online databases or websites that provide information about different types and sizes of vessels. Another factor that determines the applicability of Title 46 is the area and mode of operation of your vessel. There are different types of areas and modes of operation that affect the regulations and standards that your vessel must comply with. Some of the common types of areas and modes of operation are:


  • Inland waters: These are waters that are not part of the territorial sea or the high seas, such as rivers, lakes, canals, etc. Vessels that operate on inland waters are subject to the regulations in Subchapter M (Parts 136-144) of Chapter I, which cover towing vessels and their safety management systems.



  • Coastal waters: These are waters that are part of the territorial sea or contiguous zone of a coastal state, such as bays, harbors, estuaries, etc. Vessels that operate on coastal waters are subject to the regulations in Subchapter C (Parts 24-31) of Chapter I, which cover load lines for vessels on domestic voyages.



  • Ocean waters: These are waters that are part of the high seas or exclusive economic zones of a coastal state, such as oceans, seas, gulfs, etc. Vessels that operate on ocean waters are subject to the regulations in Subchapter E (Parts 42-46) of Chapter I, which cover load lines for vessels on international voyages.



  • Domestic trade: This is the mode of operation where a vessel engages in trade between ports or places within the same country or customs territory. Vessels that operate in domestic trade are subject to the regulations in Subchapter H (Parts 70-89) of Chapter I, which cover passenger vessels.



  • Foreign trade: This is the mode of operation where a vessel engages in trade between ports or places in different countries or customs territories. Vessels that operate in foreign trade are subject to the regulations in Subchapter O (Parts 151-160) of Chapter I, which cover certain bulk dangerous cargoes.



  • Offshore trade: This is the mode of operation where a vessel engages in trade between ports or places within the same country or customs territory and offshore installations or facilities. Vessels that operate in offshore trade are subject to the regulations in Subchapter L (Parts 125-133) of Chapter I, which cover offshore supply vessels.



To find out the area and mode of operation of your vessel, you can check the ship's documents or certificates or consult with the ship's owner or operator. You can also use online databases or websites that provide information about different areas and modes of operation for vessels.


One of the factors that determines the applicability of Title 46 is the type and size of your vessel. There are many types of vessels that are used for different purposes and have different characteristics. Some of the common types of vessels are:


  • Container ships: These are vessels that carry cargo in standardized containers that can be easily loaded and unloaded. Container ships are classified by their size and capacity, such as Panamax, Suezmax, Post-Panamax, etc.



  • Bulk carriers: These are vessels that carry dry bulk cargo, such as grains, coal, ore, cement, etc. Bulk carriers are also classified by their size and capacity, such as Handysize, Handymax, Panamax, Capesize, etc.



Tanker ships: These are vessels that carry liquid cargo, such as oil, gas, chemicals, etc. Tanker ships are also classified by their size and capacity, such as Aframax,


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